Dive sites

Exploring the many different ecosystems of St. Eustatius is diving in constant changing environments. Almost all of the 36 official sites are moored to save the reef from anchorage. We also love to drift from one site to the other to show you the true hidden treasures.


Charles L. Brown Wreck

The Charles Brown is one of the largest and most impressive wrecks in the Caribbean (100m/ 327ft). This cable laying ship built in Italy in 1954 was cleaned and sunk in 2003 as an artificial reef for divers. Once operating in the Maldives, it now rests on its side in front of the island. The view when you approach is spectacular. The wreck has most of its superstructure intact and is easy to penetrate for those who want to. Horse-eye jacks form dense schools above the wreck while huge barracudas live right on it. For those thrill seekers who want to explore the interior of this ship, sign up for a wreck dive specialty and go for it!

Degree of difficulty: ✩✩
Depth: 102 feet (31 meters)
Special features: Charles Brown Wreck



Lost Anchor

This reef recently discovered by ‘our’ guide (and island archeologist) Ruud is worth investigating. Ruud was all exiting the first time he found two huge anchors, but the number of anchors rises almost every time we dive this reef. It’s located a few miles off shore and the lack of a mooring makes this a more advanced dive. Hundreds of barracuda’s and rabbitfish escort you during this dive and queen angelfish love this reef.

Degree of difficulty: ✩✩✩
Depth: 82 feet (25 meters)
Topography: Historical/Reef



Gibraltar

This giant rock (14 mtr high by 16 mtr wide) in the far north of the island is a really unique dive site. Normally you only found deepwater sea fans in deep water but this shallow rock is covered with it. Schooling barracuda’s are guarding the rock and there is a big change to find the beautiful jackknife fish. On our way to the rock and back to the boat we find enormous boulders , the favorite place for nurse shark to take a nap.

Degree of difficulty: ✩
Depth: 66 feet (20 meters)
Topography: Reef/Wall



Shark Reef

This hidden secret in the north of the island is THE place to encounter reef sharks. The lack of a mooring, depth and sometimes strong currents make this a real advanced dive. The reef is surrounded by deeper water and gives you the feeling you dive in the open ocean. Besides sharks there is an abundance of barracuda’s, jacks and don’t even try to count the lobsters.

Degree of difficulty: ✩✩✩
Depth: 98 feet (30 meters)
Topography: Reef/Wall



Aquarium

This hidden lava bomb in the remote north of the island is covered with coral and sponges. This dive site is packed with reef fish, scorpion fish and turtles. Sennets form dense schools between the lava bombs and you may even find a sea horse hanging on a coral branch.

Degree of difficulty: ✩
Depth: 59 feet (18 meters)
Topography: Reef



Humps

The Humps are huge coral-covered lava bombs and lava ‘fingers’. Due to the shallow depth it’s a perfect dive site for beginners but experienced divers love this dive site as well. You find loads of (juvenile) reef fish, corals and sponges. A true heaven for marco-lovers.

Degree of difficulty: ✩
Depth: 52 feet (16 meters)
Topography: Reef



STENAPA

A sunken barge, a tugboat and the hull of a ship are now a safe place for many (juvenile) fish. At night, huge turtles gather here to sleep and corals open their polyps to feed. The tugboat is like a firework of colours during the night, something you cannot miss!

Degree of difficulty: ✩
Depth: 59 feet (18 meters)
Topography: Wreck



Volcano Fingers

My favourite dive is Volcano Fingers which is one of our deep dives. As there is no mooring, we jump in the blue and descend until we reach the lava flows which we call the volcano fingers. After a while we descend to 40 m, and then ascend along the canyon of lava flows of Grand Canyon and finish the dive in shallow waters in Humps where we can see beautiful corals, sponges, turtles and seahorses.

Degree of difficulty: ✩✩✩
Depth: 131+ feet (40+ meters)
Topography: Wall



Blair

This underwater coral island attracts schooling reef fish. You find plenty of lobsters in the cracks of an overhang. Barracudas circle around the anchor line. And you may even find a sea horse hanging on to a piece of coral.

Degree of difficulty: ✩
Depth: 62 feet (19 meters)
Topography: Reef



Chien Tong

Chien Tong was once a 52m/170ft Taiwanese long-liner but is now a magnet for turtles, barracudas, reef sharks and other marine life. It is THE place for night diving: giant hawksbill turtles, green turtles use the wreck as a hotel for the night.

Degree of difficulty: ✩
Depth: 72 feet (22 meters)
Topography: Wreck



Double Wreck

Despite its name, Double Wreck is not a wreck dive because all the wood of the wrecks has rotten away. Only a few ballast stones and two huge anchors remind you of the ships which sank 300 years ago. The rest of the ballast stones are now fully grown in with sponges and coral. It is a rather small dive site, so it gives you plenty of time to search all the cracks and corals for interesting marine life, 100% guaranteed! A huge family of tiny blennies use the old anchors as a skyscraper. You can see their little heads popping out when you come closer.The whole dive site is guarded by huge southern stingrays who are so relaxed you can approach them as close as you dare. During almost every dive, a barracuda or turtle guides you back to the anchor buoy. I did not have one dive on Double Wreck without one of these encounters.

Degree of difficulty: ✩
Depth: 62 feet (18 meters)
Topography: Reef/Historical



Anchor point

The old coral-covered anchor blends into the surrounding reef. It is a French anchor dating to the period of 1750-1775, it is about 310 cm long and weights 587 kg: probably one of the most beautiful anchor we have in Statia. Before you reach the anchor you encounter a swim through, walls packed with lobsters and huge barrel sponges.

Degree of difficulty: ✩
Depth: 62 feet (18 meters)
Topography: Reef/Historical



Cliffs

A big steep vertical wall brings you around the corner where we end our dive on the top of the reef where you find yellow head goby and schooling creole wrasse. Black coral grows on the deep end of the wall where pelagics swim by.

Degree of difficulty: ✩✩✩
Depth: 131+ feet (40+ meters)
Topography: Wall



Blue Bead Hole

Finding a Blue Bead (actually they find you, according to the legend) while diving in the Blue Bead Hole is something you won’t forget the rest of your life. But even if you don’t find one during your dive, the site has a lot of surprises. You have a big chance of admiring pieces of Statia’s rich history, such as clay pipes and pottery. Besides these artefacts – that you can only admire and cannot take with you! -, you will probably come eye to eye with Statia’s most beautiful fish with a dinosaur-looking head, and the most colourful blue fins, the Flying Gurnard!

Degree of difficulty: ✩
Depth: 55 feet (17 meters)
Topography: Muck/Historical



Barracuda

This large sloping basalt plate has vertical walls full of cracks with abundant coral, sponges and marine life, and are places to see nurse sharks taking a nap under the overhangs. Barracudas keep an eye on you when you descend and ascend by the anchor line.

Degree of difficulty: 
Depth:
 72 feet (22 meters)
Topography: 
Reef/Wall



Grand Canyon

You dive between pinnacles fully covered with black corals. Pinnacles are submerged steep islands, and diving between them gives you the real ‘grand canyon’ feeling. If you only pay attention to the vertical walls of the pinnacles you may miss the pelagics such as eagle rays and sharks who often visit this dive site.

Degree of difficulty: ✩✩✩
Depth: 86 feet (26 meters)
Topography: Wall



Hangover

The perfect mix of coral gardens, sandy areas, and fascinating overhangs which will give you so much to look at, you might get a “hangover”! With a depth of between 14 and a maximum of 20 meters, you can hang around for almost hours and that gives you the chance of seeing a lot of different fish species, either in one big school or individuals. The “balcony” at the end of the reef is the spot to stay and wait for the fish to come. Relax, look into the blue and they will come closer and closer and “dance” around you. A little grey reef-shark is often swimming around checking his territory.

Degree of difficulty: ✩
Depth: 55 feet (17 meters)
Topography: Reef



Drop off

In the south of the island the ocean floor drops down almost vertically. The volcano kind of continuous under water here. The dive starts on top of some amazing deep lava flows fully covered with deep water sea fans. After a while we ascend next to a vertical wall till we end up on the upper reef. Pelagic fish are frequently observed in the deep blue and the landscape here is just phenomenal.

Degree of difficulty: ✩✩✩
Depth: 131+ feet (40+ meters)
Topography: Reef/wall